News & Insights

Market Review – Q4 2017

by Financial Alternatives on 2/8/2018

  • Looking at broad market indices, emerging markets outperformed US and non-US developed markets during the quarter.
  • Small caps outperformed large caps in non-US developed markets and emerging markets but underperformed in the US.
  • The Bloomberg Commodity Index Total Return gained 4.71% in the fourth quarter, bringing the 2017 total annual return to 1.70%.
  • Article: What Should Investors Make of Bitcoin (cryptocurrency) Mania?

posted in InvestingNewsletters

Investing Newsletter – Jan 2018

by Financial Alternatives on 2/8/2018

  • 2017 was an exceptional year for globally diversified investors.
  • The US Shiller CAPE 10 year PE ratio is reaching historic levels indicating that the US stock market may be overvalued.
  • Vanguard’s US fair-value CAPE measurement that adjusts for inflation and interest rates indicates a less overvalued US market.
  • International Developed and Emerging Market Shiller CAPE 10 year PE ratios are less elevated which may indicate higher future long term returns for these markets versus US markets.
  • Valuation measurements such as the Shiller CAPE 10 PE ratio tell us nothing about when to expect the next market correction or bear market.
  • Rational investors should expect lower returns in the foreseeable future.
  • After significant gains in 2017, investors should consider rebalancing their portfolios especially if they are concerned about elevated stock market valuations.

posted in InvestingNewsletters

How Are Your Financial Institutions and Advisor Compensated? It’s Important.

by Jim Freeman, CFP® on 1/19/2018

Wells Fargo is the latest example of a financial institution harming its clients by creating a compensation structure that incentivized employees to act contrary to their clients’ best interest.

Regulators found over 3.5 million fake credit card and bank accounts created by Wells Fargo employees who were pressured by managers to meet unrealistic sales goals. Wells Fargo was also caught selling nearly 1,500 renters and term life insurance policies to clients without their knowledge.

How in the world could this ever happen?

Some Wells Fargo customers said bank employees lied to them saying they were giving them a quote when in fact they were unknowingly being signed up for a policy.

When these issues were initially uncovered, Wells Fargo fired thousands and tried to lay the blame on these rouge employees. But as the truth came out, it was obvious that the problem lay with management’s incentive compensation structure. In reality it was the leadership who had put extreme pressure on employees to sell products in an effort in increase profits and thereby increase bonuses.

Misguided Incentive Structures Are the Rule, Not the Exception

Some people were surprised at what Wells Fargo was up to. I was not in the least bit surprised.

In general, financial institutions and their salespeople exist to maximize the profits of the corporations they work for, and hence compensation. To generate higher profits you need to sell products that have higher profit margins which are naturally more expensive to clients.

Let’s take a look at a simplified example to show how powerful these incentives really are.

For our simple example, let’s say an investor walks into a financial institution with $1,000,000 that they just inherited and need to invest  into a long term investment.

The financial salesperson discusses two options for this investment. The first option is an annuity plus a private REIT (real estate investment trust). The second option is a portfolio of low cost no load mutual funds. Remember this investor is relying upon the sales person to tell him which option is the best option for him.  In most cases, the unsophisticated investor will go with whatever the professional’s recommendation is.

Now let’s look at how the compensation works in both scenarios:

  • If the prospective client goes with option one, the financial institution will earn a commission of $50,000 or more as soon as the investment is made and then a much smaller trailing commission each year thereafter.
  • If the prospective client goes with option two, the financial institution will earn a fee of $2,500 as soon as the investment is made and then they will be paid roughly $2,500 a quarter, increasing each quarter as the value of the portfolio increases going forward.

As you can see, it would take over five years for the compensation paid from option two to even begin to approach option one. The incentives to sell option one are enormous.

Even if the broker feels that option two is a better one for this client, the pressure from his manager and company to sell option one will be severe because the rewards to the institution are so much higher.

Step 1: Hire a Financial Advisor Who Works Only for You – Not for a Financial Institution

You can beat these self-serving, conflict-ridden financial institutions simply by hiring an advisor that is 100% compensated by you and 100% loyal to you. Such an advisor is known as a 100% fee-only advisor.

The advisor must be free and independent of all financial institutions. Because such an advisor is only paid by you, he or she will naturally be completely loyal only to you.

It makes sense because now your advisor is being paid to work for you rather than for a financial institution. Your advisor is being paid to research, know and introduce you to the best financial institutions and financial strategies without an ulterior motive of selling you products that will boost some financial institution’s bottom line.

They will introduce you to institutions known for their low cost and solid performance such as Vanguard Investments and Dimensional Fund Advisors.  If you need insurance, your advisor is now being paid to help you find a carrier offering the least expensive (yet highest quality) insurance products without an incentive to steer you in any particular direction.

Hiring a 100% fee-only advisor can transform your financial and investment planning.

Step 2: Hire an Advisor Who is Committed to a Systematic, Detailed & Integrated Process

To get the absolute most out of your fee-only financial advisor, be sure to select one that is committed to a systematic, detailed & integrated financial & investment planning process.

Your advisor’s process should integrate and coordinate all areas of your finances, and your advisor should work in concert with your other advisors such as your CPA and estate planner. If you select your advisor well, you should look back years from now and feel that this was one of the best decisions that you ever made.

If you would like to know if your advisor is truly acting in your best interest, contact us for a fiduciary review.

posted in BlogPersonal Finance

What High Earners Should Know About the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

by Ellen Li, MSBA, CFP® on 1/5/2018

Understanding the implications of the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act is important for any high earner, or high earning family, who wants to maintain its financial success.

As illustrated below, the recent tax reform will modify the tax rate for high income earners. But that’s just where it begins. High earners should also be aware of how the tax code will significantly impact the decisions you are making about your healthcare, business, and gifting decisions.

Table Source: “Highlights of the Final Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, “ by Tim Steffen, 2017 (http://www.investmentnews.com/assets/docs/CI1136191218.PDF)
Read more

posted in BlogGeneralPersonal Finance

5 Year-End Tax Planning Tips for 2017

by Chris Jaccard, CFP®, CFA on 12/1/2017

Here are a some tax-planning techniques and strategies you can still consider in the last few weeks of the year:

1. Watch out for large mutual fund distributions this year

Many mutual funds have realized large gains and typically distribute those gains in November and December.  Don’t buy a mutual fund in your brokerage account right before it makes a 10%, 20%, or 30% (of NAV) distribution – it just turns part of your purchase into a taxable event!  Look for widely published estimates, and if expected to be large, make sure you buy shares after a fund’s ex-dividend date.

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posted in BlogPersonal Finance

Stock Returns – The Uncommon Average

by Jim Freeman, CFP® on 11/10/2017

The US stock market has delivered an average annual return of around 10% since 1926 (as measured by the S&P 500 Index through 2016). But short-term results may vary, and in any given period stock returns can be positive, negative, or flat. When setting expectations, it’s helpful to see the range of outcomes experienced by investors historically. For example, how often have the stock market’s annual returns actually aligned with its long-term average?

Exhibit 1 shows calendar year returns for the S&P 500 Index since 1926. The shaded band marks the historical average of 10%, plus or minus 2 percentage points. The S&P 500 had a return within this range in only six of the past 91 calendar years. In most years the index’s return was outside of the range, often above or below by a wide margin, with no obvious pattern. For investors, this data highlights the importance of looking beyond average returns and being aware of the range of potential outcomes.

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posted in BlogInvestments

Market Review – Q3 2017

by Financial Alternatives on 10/13/2017

  • Emerging markets outperformed developed markets, including the US, during the quarter.
  • In US dollar terms, developed markets outperformed US equity indices but underperformed emerging markets indices during the quarter.
  • The Bloomberg Commodity Index Total Return gained 2.52% during the third quarter.
  • Interest rates increased slightly across the US fixed income market for the quarter, but total returns still remained positive for most investment grade indices.

posted in InvestingNewsletters

Planning Newsletter – Oct 2017

by Financial Alternatives on 10/13/2017

Tax Reform or Not

  • The recent tax proposal would significantly change income taxes, but there are many important provisions that have not been specified.
  • The most noteworthy part of the proposal is a full repeal of the estate tax.
  • Due to the makeup of Congress and the expected costs of the tax proposal, some sort of compromise will be required to push any changes through.

Remembering the Last Crisis

  • The 10 year anniversary of a record S&P 500 high point is upon us, with several other crisis period anniversaries like the Lehman bankruptcy coming in succeeding months.
  • Reflecting on your experience back then and looking at the recoveries of other financial crises can help prepare you for the next one.
  • A key part of a good long-term investing experience is being able to stay with your investment philosophy, even during tough times.

posted in NewslettersPlanning

Embracing Retirement by Making the Right Housing Decisions

by Ellen Li, MSBA, CFP® on 9/22/2017

As a busy financial advisor and  mother, I like to balance myself with the practice of yoga. To me, yoga is more than just the practice of body movement, it’s  also an exercise of mental discipline.  Recently one of my favorite instructors used “embrace change” as our mantra and it really resonated  with me both  professionally and personally.

At Financial Alternatives, we recently helped two clients make new housing choices in their retirement years — one client remodeled their house and redesigned the living space on the first floor to make living there safer and more comfortable. The second client decided to move to an assisted living facility. In both cases, it was a transition, a new change that our clients embraced with courage and wisdom.  Stories such as these show the importance of making the right housing decisions  during your retirement years. These decisions could  have a tremendous effect on you  both financially and emotionally.

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posted in BlogGeneralPersonal Finance

5 Steps to Take After the Equifax Breach

by Chris Jaccard, CFP®, CFA on 9/14/2017

Background

Now that some of the dust has settled on one of the worst cyber security breaches in history, we think everyone should go through the 5 steps listed below.  Why everyone?  Because there is no way to be certain if you have been affected by the Equifax breach or not.  I entered false info to test Equifax’s verification site including a last name of “test” and a SSN of “123456” only to find that it positively identified me as a person impacted by the breach.  [9/16/17 Update: Equifax’s Chief Information Officer and Chief Security Officer are “retiring” and their internal investigation continues.]

Also, please make sure everyone in your family has taken these steps including your spouse, kids in college, domestic partner, and perhaps even minor children.

Step 1: Review Your Credit Report

Use the Annual Credit Report site to review your credit report from at least one of the three listed credit reporting agencies (“CRAs”).  By law, you are allowed one copy every 12 months, so we suggest you request a report from one of the three CRAs every 4 months.  Check for rogue activity or inaccuracies, and contact the CRAs to address the issue.

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posted in BlogGeneralPersonal Finance

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Posts are general in nature and do not constitute the rendering of legal, investment, accounting or other professional advice.