News & Insights

Financial Questions to Ask Yourself on Your Work Anniversary

by Ellen Li, MSBA, CFP® on 6/26/2018

Perhaps the notifications we get on LinkedIn have led to the popularization of the term “work anniversary. ” The passing of another year isn’t just nominal; it can be an opportunity to evaluate how well your job is meeting your financial needs. As you celebrate another year at your job, here are some questions that you should ask yourself.

Income

The first thing to ask yourself on your work anniversary is if the salary still fits your income requirements. If not, consider putting together a summary of your accomplishments and contributions over the year to make the case for higher compensation.  Always know if your salary is in line with what others are earning. You can check this information on sites such as Payscale.

When looking at your income, try to get an idea of what your future earnings are projected to be if you were to continue on along the same path. At which point do you anticipate a bump in earnings? What action would you need to commit to in order to earn that increase?

It may be a good time to think about what your retirement will look like at your projected earnings. Are you comfortable with where you would be in retirement at this rate or does it signal a possible shortfall?

Key questions to ask yourself:

  • What do I need to do to make more money, and it is worth taking the risk at this point in my life to do that?
  • Am I earning an income that is commensurate with my skills and experience?
  • What is the position I will be in when I retire if I continue to earn the level of income I am projecting?

Read more

posted in BlogPersonal Finance

What is the Right Way to Educate the Next Generation About Money?

by Jim Freeman, CFP® on 6/22/2018

Here are some tips for successfully imparting the knowledge and wisdom about money that your family needs to educate the next generation about money.

Most families, even the more financially successful ones, don’t talk about money the right way, or even put much attention into discussing money as a family at all. For a variety of reasons this is harmful to a family’s continued wellbeing. Here are some tips for successfully imparting the knowledge and wisdom about money that your family needs to know to educate the next generation about money.

Family Money Conversations are Tough

More often than not, family dialogues about money don’t happen the right way. Everyone wishes they had more money. As a result, conversations can get emotional and often degenerate into:

  • Arguing
  • Complaining
  • Finger pointing
  • Regret
  • Resentment (Mom and Dad paid to send you to med school and didn’t have enough for me)
  • Shame (I loaned my ex-boyfriend some money and he never paid me back)
  • Jealousy (My brother makes more money than me)
  • Fear

If money is even on the agenda at all, it’s normally not a constructive addition to the family meeting. How is that conducive to a system that will educate the next generation about money?

Read more

posted in BlogPersonal Finance

Stuck in Paradise

by Jim Freeman, CFP® on 6/4/2018

The following is an excerpt from The Financial Alternatives Column in Coast News. In this article, Jim’s co-author Matt discusses his decision to stay in his condominium.

I recently explored upgrading from my current condo into a house, but the resulting property tax and mortgage expense increase would be too great for me to justify a move. This same predicament, which I call the “golden handcuffs” provides disincentives for many homeowners to move, fanning the flames of the affordable housing shortage in North County.

FINISH READING HERE

posted in Blog

What You Need to Know About Preventing Elder Abuse in La Jolla, CA

by Chris Jaccard, CFP®, CFA on 5/18/2018

It is a sad fact of life that often those who are close to us are the ones who have the ability to hurt us the most, even trusted caregivers or family members. Members of the La Jolla community may recall the chilling case of Robert Stella, an elderly man who was tied to his bed, starved, and forced to live in squalor by his ex-wife (NBC, 2014). Elder abuse can happen to any older adult in any community, but the subject of our story today is how our community members in La Jolla, CA may defend themselves and their loved ones from elder abuse.

Elder Abuse: The Silent Perpetrator

Elder abuse takes many forms. In some cases the crime is overt and violent, but most of the time the unsuspecting victim is silently preyed upon for a period of time by a familiar person.

  • It can be as surreptitious as the plumber who “cases” the house on routine visits, only to return back through an unsecured window at a time when he knows that the victim is asleep or habitually out of the house. He pillages as much money and jewelry as he can from the places where he knows the victim keeps her valuables, and then leaves.
  • Elder abuse can happen over the phone. Let’s say an older adult suffering from dementia receives a solicitation from someone pretending to be a relative, saying that they have an immediate need to wire over some money to get them out of a pinch.
  • We’ve even heard of Medicaid facilities partaking of the monies awarded to the facilities’ patients to use for themselves while the patients starve or go malnourished.
  • Sadly, elder abuse even happens within families. Ex-spouses, children, siblings, cousins, etc., acting out of desperation, can act as perpetrators of this crime to their own family members.

Americans who are financially abused lose an average of $140,500, according to a Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards study (CFP Board, 2012).

Finally, the Industry Reacts

Over the past few years, several states have enacted regulations to protect vulnerable adults from exploitation and abuse and now the financial services industry is catching up – enacting the first uniform, national standard to protect vulnerable adults.

Read more

posted in BlogPersonal Finance

Market Review Q1 2018: Sailing with the Tides

by Jim Freeman, CFP® on 5/16/2018

Embarking on a financial plan is like sailing around the world. The voyage won’t always go to plan, and there will be rough seas. But the odds of reaching your destination increase greatly if you are prepared, flexible, patient, and well-advised.

A mistake many inexperienced sailors make is not having a plan at all. They embark without a clear sense of their destination. And once they do decide, they often find themselves lost at sea in the wrong boat with inadequate provisions.

Likewise, in planning an investment journey, you need to decide on your goal. A first step might be to consider whether the goal is realistic and achievable. For instance, while you may long to retire in the south of France, you may not be prepared to sacrifice your needs today to satisfy that distant desire.

Once you are set on a realistic destination, you need to ensure you have the right portfolio to get you there. Have you planned for multiple contingencies? What degree of “bad weather” can your plan withstand along the way?

Key to a successful voyage is a good navigator. A trusted advisor is like that, regularly taking coordinates and making adjustments, if necessary. If your circumstances change, the advisor may suggest you replot your course.

As with the weather at sea, markets can be unpredictable. A sudden squall can whip up waves of volatility, tides can shift, and strong currents can threaten to blow you off course. Like a seasoned sailor, an experienced advisor will work with the conditions. Once the storm passes, you can pick up speed again. Just as a sturdy vessel will help you withstand most conditions at sea, a well-diversified portfolio can act as a bulwark against the sometimes tempestuous conditions in markets.

Circumnavigating the globe is not exciting every day. Patience is required with local customs and paperwork as you pull into different ports. Likewise, a lack of attention to costs and taxes is the enemy of many a long-term financial plan.

Distractions can also send investors, like sailors, off course. In the face of “hot” investment trends, it takes discipline not to veer from your chosen plan. Like the sirens of Greek mythology, media pundits can also be diverting, tempting you to change tack and act on news that is already priced in to markets.

A lack of flexibility is another impediment to a successful investment journey. If it doesn’t look as though you’ll make your destination in time, you may have to extend your voyage, take a different route to get there, or even moderate your goal.

The important point is that you become comfortable with the idea that uncertainty is inherent to the investment journey, just as it is with any sea voyage. That is why preparation and planning are so critical. While you can’t control every outcome, you can be prepared for the range of possibilities and understand that you have clear choices if things don’t go according to plan.

If you can’t live with the volatility, you can change your plan. If the goal looks unachievable, you can lower your sights. If it doesn’t look as if you’ll arrive on time, you can extend your journey.

Of course, not everyone’s journey is the same. Neither is everyone’s destination. We take different routes to different places, and we meet a range of challenges and opportunities along the way. But for all of us, it’s critical that we are prepared for our journeys in the right vessel, keep our destinations in mind, stick with the plans, and have a trusted navigator to chart our courses and keep us on target.

 

Adapted from “Sailing with the Tides,” Outside the Flags by Jim Parker, March 2018.

Past performance is no guarantee of future results. There is no guarantee an investing strategy will be successful. Diversification does not eliminate the risk of market loss. All expressions of opinion are subject to change.

This article is distributed for informational purposes, and it is not to be construed as an offer, solicitation, recommendation, or endorsement of any particular security, products, or services. Dimensional Fund Advisors LP is an investment advisor registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

posted in Investing

Market Review – Q1 2018

by Financial Alternatives on 4/25/2018

  • Looking at broad market indices, emerging markets outperformed developed markets, including the US, in the first quarter.
  • Non-US real estate investment trusts outperformed US REITs in the first quarter.
  • Interest rates increased in the US during the first quarter.
  • The yield on the 10-year Treasury note increased to 2.74%.

posted in InvestingNewsletters

Planning Newsletter – Apr 2018

by Financial Alternatives on 4/25/2018

  • The amount you can pass without owing estate taxes essentially doubled as of January 1st thanks to the recently passed Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.
  • This estate tax provision will expire at the end of 2025.
  • Estate plans based on prior tax law should be re-evaluated to ensure your intentions match the current law.
  • Older estate plans may ultimately cost your beneficiaries more in taxes and/or unnecessary recordkeeping requirements.

posted in NewslettersPlanning

What Your Investment Advisor Should Be Doing to Protect Your Confidentiality

by Financial Alternatives on 4/2/2018

Here are some things your investment advisor should be doing to protect your client confidentiality.

Silence and privacy are the most undervalued assets in a client’s portfolio. We say this to acknowledge an often overlooked facet of investment management and financial planning: client confidentiality. This is something that many financial advisors and even their clients don’t pay enough attention to until it is too late. Is your advisor doing what your advisor should be doing to protect your confidentiality? Read on to figure it out. 

The Affluent Person’s #1 Fear is Being Discovered 

Anyone who has been taken advantage of financially knows too well that wealth can sometimes attract unsavory types and bring out the greed in people. Most affluent people live in fear (and in fact it is their #1 fear) of having others in their lives –including some of their friends and relatives – know how much money they have. They could end up being judged or criticized and the awkwardness it creates may be harmful to relationships. 

Aside from the social fears, there are real risks to having the public know how much money you have. You face a higher risk of being kidnapped or robbed. And that leads to the affluent person’s second biggest fear – losing it all.  

Read more

posted in BlogGeneral

Beware the Ides of March: Are You Your Own Retirement’s Worst Enemy?

by Financial Alternatives on 3/7/2018

The Ides of March commemorate Julius Caesar, the Emperor who significantly expanded the Roman Empire — only to meet his demise by a conspiracy carried out by his own people.  Just as Caesar’s fate turned to misfortune as a result of his tragic flaw, we see people who are their wealth’s worst enemy. If you’re making these retirement planning mistakes, it’s best to seek counsel before the bright day brings forth the adder.

Making Emotional Decisions

In our decades of experience, we’ve seen examples of perfectly rational, logical people who make emotional decisions that lead to their finances becoming compromised. Unfortunately, being called in to be the independent voice of reason after the fact is a step too late.

A common emotional trap that people run into when managing their own money includes holding on to company stock or an inherited position for nostalgia reasons. This can lead to dangerously undiversified portfolios.

Timing the Market

Very few people get this right. Most of the time, trying to sell at the top of the market and buy when the market has dipped creates more trouble than it prevents. Even professional money managers can’t successfully time the market.

Choose an advisor who will balance your needs for principle protection, income, and growth against market conditions. This approach, rather than one of reactive trading, is the best way to create long term growth.

Read more

posted in BlogGeneralPersonal Finance

Market Review – Q4 2017

by Financial Alternatives on 2/8/2018

  • Looking at broad market indices, emerging markets outperformed US and non-US developed markets during the quarter.
  • Small caps outperformed large caps in non-US developed markets and emerging markets but underperformed in the US.
  • The Bloomberg Commodity Index Total Return gained 4.71% in the fourth quarter, bringing the 2017 total annual return to 1.70%.
  • Article: What Should Investors Make of Bitcoin (cryptocurrency) Mania?

posted in InvestingNewsletters

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Posts are general in nature and do not constitute the rendering of legal, investment, accounting or other professional advice.